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. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
insurance. >>> this week marks the 48th anniversary of the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to montgomery, alabama. harry belafonte recruited tony bennett to march with him it happened has marchers tried to cross the bridge, known as bloody sunday. the message of civil rights still permeates today. >> selma was different, that they were willing to kill, bomb, burn, destroy, so to ask our people to go there was a whole different game. >> he remembers the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not along at 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody selma happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it, what was the mood? >> the mood was the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and this kind of mayhem. the bottom line was that we go back as often as necessary. >> belafonte, enlisted by dr. king to bring artists into the movement, convinced the likes of joan baez, paul newman and marlon brando, bu
already had a conservative back lash building against the court from griswold and from civil rights and from miranda even. so it wasn't just this one decision that created that sort of back lash. and the other reason i don't think the parallel holds here is because people who believe, who are pro-life. who are staunchly pro-life, believe that abortion is tantamount to murder. no one thinks that gay marriage is like murder. so i don't think the emotions here run quite as high either. it is hard to imagine people really taking to the streets if doma were to be overturn at this time. >> yeah. and the other part of that is that while the emotions come from the grassroots, there has been a real shift among the political leadership in this country. when you look from president obama to president clinton to hillary clinton to rob portman to dick cheney, cleric mccaskill, jon huntsman. there are a tremendous number of federal officials, highly visible people in both parties. not only saying people should have this right, which is the moral position, but also saying something that i think cr
of the civil rights division at the justice department the president also marked women's history month today, but talking about the long fight for equal rights. >> 100 years ago this month, thousands of women were marching right outside this house, demanding one of our most fundamental rights, the right to vote. a century later. its rooms are full of accomplished well who have overcome discrimination, shattered glass ceilings, and become outstanding role models for all of our sons and daughters. all of you inspire me to make sure that i'm doing everything that i can as president to carry on that progress. >>> and he keeps that promise. less than two weeks ago the president signed the new violence against women act into law, part of a broad progressive push we have seen in this second term. a kyle senate panel is said to be close to a deal on immigration. unemployment is down to 7.7%, the lowest level in four years. since the gop's big loss, republicans have spent a lot of times looking backwards, but the president is moving the country ahead. joining me now is victoria defran chez ko soto, a
luther king memorial in washington. the president, connecting one civil rights and human rights leader to another, it's the melting of history, disconnection, the connection of the civil rights movement. that's the president brought throughout his trip. >> the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. >> african-americans and jewish americans march with rabbis carrying as they walked. they boarded buses for freedom rights together. they bled together, gave their lives together. >> this is our obligation, not simply to bear witness but to act. for us, in our time, this means confronting bigotry and hatred in all of its forms. >> confronting it in all of its forms all over the world. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> shameless. let's play "hardball". ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. i hated the iraq war, said so when i s
that promise for everybody, the cause of his life. as a civil rights attorney, an aide to senator ted kennedy, a member of the montgomery, maryland county council, tom fought for a level playing field, where hard work and responsibility are rewarded and working families can get ahead. and this is not the first time that he's chosen to be a labor secretary, either. we've got here today governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed tom as secretary of maryland's department of labor where he helped implement the country's first statewide living wage law. because he understood that a minimum wage should be a wage that you can live on. in his current role as the head of the u.s. justice department's civil rights division, he fought to open pathways to the work fos for everybody willing to contribute, and he's helped settle some of the largest cases ever on behalf of families targeted by unfair mortgage lending. now while he's tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has also spent a career as a consensus builder. he's worked with ceos, he's worked with labor leaders, he's worked at federal, state and
of churches and civil rights movement and when you look at the role really of societal movements, they often leap ahead of the law. and we're seeing that right now with this is an example. the fact this can happen in winston salem, again, it's the fifth largest city here in north carolina. you know, this is really unprecedented and you know, among methodist churches, you have some others in places like austin and chicago and of course, california, that that have enacted similar moves like this, but not in the deep south. not in north carolina. this is really important what's happening here. >> give me a brief answer. do you think we'll see marriage equality in your lifetime? >> in north carolina? well, you know, i write about manners, so not a great thing to ask someone their edge, but i'm hopeful that it's coming. >> all right. thank you so very much. >> thank you, michael. >> that's the ed show. the rachel maddow show starts now. >>> thanks to you at home for joining us. the great state of florida does not right now have a lieutenant governor. they have a governor, of course. you know, old
is that this is like civil rights. that this is the civil rights movement moved to the gay and lesbian community. why is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. when our democratic institutions are capable of handling the issue. that's what the court will decide. whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case
's the right thing to do. it's a civil rights issue. it's not just gay people who want you to be for marriage equali equality. it's a broad segment of the electorate. if you look at that poll the majority of catholics are for marriage equality. a majority of -- the minority communities are for marriage equality. i just think it is more and more a basic civil rights issue that people are going to expect you to be on the right side of. >> steve, thanks so much. good to see you. >> good to see you. >>> in south carolina today the first test of former governor mark sanford's attempt at a post scandal political comeback. sanford running against 15 other republican candidates for congress. in 2009 you'll remember he stepped down as governor after admitting an extra marital affair with an argentinian woman. among his opponents ted turner's son teddy. the primary is expected to go to a round. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically p
to be his labor secretary. perez heads the justice department's civil rights division. he has been criticized, though, by some conservatives who think he's too partisan, but he is considered a civil rights hero by others. if confirmed, perez would be the only latino in obama's cabinet. >>> and take a look here at this actor who is playing the role of satan in the history channel miniseries, "the bible." all right. so if you think it looks anything like president obama, you are not alone. social media blew up after the scene aired. there were nearly 20,000 tweets containing the words obama and satan. the producer of the show is denying that it was intentional, saying, quote, this is utter nonsense. the actor who played satan is a highly acclaimed moroccan actor, and he has previously played parts of several biblical epics, long before barack obama was elected as our president. the history channel weighed in, too, releasing this statement. quote, history channel has the highest respect for president obama. it's unfortunate that anyone made this false connection. the silver lining in
. >> this -- this is an ugly policy that needs to be addressed. that's why i and other civil rights leaders led thousands in a silent march last year to protest stop and frisk. we made noise with our silence and brought national attention to this issue. it's the new racial profiling and we won't stop fighting it. both tylenol and bayer advanced aspirin are proven to be effective pain relievers. tylenol works by blocking pain signals to your brain. bayer advanced aspirin blocks pain at the site. try the power of bayer advanced aspirin. >>> ten years ago tonight, this was the top story. >> it is early sunday morning in baghdad and it's been another long night of punishing air strikes against that city and against other targets in iraq. >> "the new york times" headline that day, rumsfeld says iraq is collapsing. lists eight objectives of war. the objectives and the rationale for the war has kept changing ever since. but ten years later, we know how this tragic story turned out. $1.7 trillion war sold to the american public on lies. no weapons of mass destruction. more than 4,000 americans killed, many thous
people's civil rights, and then get sued. and robert says it's definitely an overreach of the police and needs to be addressed in the courts. go to our facebook page right now and join the conversation and don't forget to like "the ed show" when you're there. have something neatly tucked away in the back of our mind. a secret hope. that thing we've always wanted to do. it's not about having dreams, it's about reaching them. ♪ an ally for real possibilities. aarp. find tools and direction at aarp.org/possibilities. a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> sometimes i reflect, is there something else i could do to make these guys -- i'm not talking about the leaders now, but maybe some of the house republican caucus members, not paint horns on my head. >> welcome back. at this point it's a joke. republicans have
. hire and train more officers instead of violating people's civil rights, and then get sued. and robert says it's definitely an overreach of the police and needs to be addressed in the courts. go to our facebook page right now and join the conversation and don't forget to like "the ed show" when you're there.. >>> sometimes i reflect, is there something else i could do to make these guys -- i'm not talking about the leaders now, but maybe some of the house republican caucus members, not paint horns on my head. >> welcome back. at this point it's a joke. republicans have been trying to portray president obama as other since before he was even elected. it started with the birther movement, but obama derangement syndrome has taken many forms since then. he's a socialist, he's a muslim, an elitist. he's waging a war against religion. but this weekend it took a turn. twitter erupted during the history channel's hugely popular miniseries, the bible, when someone pointed out a resemblance between the actor playing devil and president obama. he tweeted, anyone else think the devil in the bible
police department's policing problems. civil rights attorney, james chanen will discuss the federal oversight and the police department's decision to hire william bratton for new crime- fighting strategies. the meeting is set for 6:00 tonight at berkeley cop watch. that's at 2022 blake street in berkeley. that meeting, by the way, is open and it's free to the public. >>> 7:50. hardwood flooring is being put in this morning to get hp pavilion ready for march madness. the arena is hosting the second and third rounds of the ncaa tournament thursday through saturday. cal will stays unlv there on thursday. cal is the 12th seed of the east region. unlv is the fifth seeded team. it's 5-1 verses cal. [ cheers ] >> cheers broke out in morago as the st. mary's basketball team was selected to the tournament. the gaels will play tennessee tomorrow night in dayton, ohio. if they win, they will become the 11th seed of the midwest region and play the sixth seed memphis on thursday. >>> 7:51. the ncaa tournament is very important to advertisers as well. total tv revenue from all 68 games expected t
department's policing problems. civil rights attorney, james chanen will discuss the federal oversight and the police department's decision to hire william bratton for new crime- fighting strategies. the meeting is set for 6:00 tonight at berkeley cop watch. that's at 2022 blake street in berkeley. that meeting, by the way, is open and it's free to the public. >>> 7:50. hardwood flooring is being put in this morning to get hp pavilion ready for march madness. the arena is hosting the second and third rounds of the ncaa tournament thursday through saturday. cal will stays unlv there on thursday. cal is the 12th seed of the east region. unlv is the fifth seeded team. it's 5-1 verses cal. [ cheers ] >> cheers broke out in morago as the st. mary's basketball team was selected to the tournament. the gaels will play tennessee tomorrow night in dayton, ohio. if they win, they will become the 11th seed of the midwest region and play the sixth seed memphis on thursday. >>> 7:51. the ncaa tournament is very important to advertisers as well. total tv revenu
turned, civil rights law signed by lyndon johnson. to paraphrase, he said i lost the south for a generation. if you peel back what he's trying to say, anyone against this idea of diversity is going to flee the democratic party and go to the republican party. since the signing of this law, democrats have had a difficult time penetrating that bloc of the south states of the traditional southern states. and racial tension isn't part of that bloc. if the republican party really wants to move forward in terms of having diversity, it needs to acknowledge, acknowledge, not say this is who we are, but acknowledge that that part of our history is who still continues to make up a small fraction of the republican party. we're not going to allow these people to be there anymore. a cnn employee who has had shells thrown at her and called a monkey. had they gone on stage and said this is not tolerated here at the rnc, we would not embrace these people. but they didn't do that. they ignored it. >> with all the other stories going on, you may have missed this one. this week an assault ban
that the civil rights tuition has been plagued before and in the tenure for the polarization and mistrust. the key issue is the testimony before -- before the committee that listened to voter intimidation case. we did not find that perez intentionally misled the commission, the report stated but added that perez's testimony did not reflect the story regarding the involvement of political appoint tees. >> the inspector jep reported that mr. perez has take an number of steps to foster a more collegial work place. >> he fended off questions why barack obama the first african-american president has not named african-americans to his cabinet for his second term. carney replies that the cabinet is unfilled so far and the president is committed to diversity. >> bret: rosen live on the north lawn. thank you. there may be trouble ahead for the president's choice to run the environmental protection agency. correspondent doug mckelway tells us why. >> the epa's release last friday of 2,000 more e-mails from former epa administration lisa jackson alias richard windsor account falls short of what a co
their candidate. on the right, southern white democrats who were against civil rights, they were being peeled off to vote for george wallace, the symbol of proud segregation. also, different problem for the democrats. people hated the vietnam war. and the president at the time was a democrat, lyndon b. johnson. so if you were against the war, as most americans at that point were -- this is the gallop polling on the war -- the number of people who thought it was a mistake -- if you were against the war as increasingly everybody was, you were so the psyched to vote for lbj's successor. so the democrats were losing their appeal in the south because of racism, and they were losing the anti-war vote. the republican candidate tried to take advantage of that split, and was this handsome devil. nixon in 1968 was running against a democratic party that he knew was split. he was, in response, pledging to get rid of the draft. and he claimed to have a plan to end the war. he argued that if you wanted the war to end, you needed to elect him. you needed to vote the democrats out of office because clearly lbj
, reporting live. >>> it is the civil rights issue of our time. same-sex marriage. the supreme court begins hearing arguments next week. coming up, we'll talk about whether political pressure will weigh on the justices. [ female announcer ] new york strips. sudden trips. mr. wiggles and curling irons. for the little mishaps you feel, use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster neosporin. also try neosporin eczema essentials. all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and launch your dreams. today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price"
're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. and, you know, the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing. look at syria now. people are very, very upset in syria and in the region to some extent and here in the u.s. you listen to senator john mccain, very upset that the u.s. isn't intervening, isn't doing something. there was, you know, perhaps as much upset when the u.s. decided to go to war in iraq. now there's upset because of inaction, and, you know, under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. [laughter] >> guest: great. >> on the go? "after words" is available via podcast. visit booktv.org
back to see where the tide really turned, right, and that was 1964, civil rights law being signed by lyndon johnson and he said, and this is to paraphrase him, i've lost the south for the generation, meaning the democrats have lost south for a generation, and if you really peel back what he's trying to say is that anyone who was against his idea of diversity is going to free the democratic party and go to the republican party, and since the signing of this law democrats have had a very difficult time penetrating that bloc of the south states, of the traditional southern states, and racial tension is part that have block. now if the republican party really wants to move forward in terms of having didversitdivers needs to acknowledge, not say that that's who we are, acknowledge that that part of the history is continuing to make up a small partial of the republican party. a cnn employee had shells thrown at her and called a monkey had. they said this kind of attitude is not tolerated here at the rnc, we would not continue to embrace those kinds of people. they ignored it, and i hope
, would we have allowed mississippi in 1960 to determine the civil rights of african-americans? i think the answer is absolutely not. i don't want any state telling me yes or no. i want the federals telling them to say yes. >> thank you both. >>> next, the new green giant. dylan ratigan gives back to the community and america's bravest. stay with us. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and wod always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. bring your own lettuce. byol. and we'll dress it up with grilled chicken. crunchy veggies. fruits, dressings and crispy noodles. new lean cuisine salad additions. just byol. find us in frozen. earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just abou
the civil rights movement and because of the history of america and because he said several crucial phrases, essentially said that israel will never go away. so he sort of laid out the honey, then he went and gave the vinegar line saying you have to actually now do a few things you don't like, and here they are. he did a good job from the israeli critics' perspective. >> the palestinians aren't happy, the disproportionate amount of time in israel and what he asked of the two leaders, made no public demand of netanyahu yet in israel he talked about the settlement issue. it is different than four years ago, on the arab street, including ra mal a, thought it would be different. now the israelis think we understand each other better here. >> one thing the president succeeded doing, strategically very important, john, the president set up a phone call between the prime minister of israel and the leader of turkey, the prime minister, and they both agreed turkey, a nate oh ally, israel a close ally, they were going to try to normalize the relationship. it is important for the region and the u.s. a
. it's tomas perez, assistant attorney general, who heads up civil rights division. the president is preparing for a visit to israel tomorrow. the first international trip of his second term and first of his presidency to jewish state. after visiting jerusalem he'll head to jordan. >>> this is the internal review detailing where the party went wrong in 2012 and how to reverse fortunes for the next election. >> we have to relate things to people's lives. we have to win the math war, which we do a good job of. but we have to learn how to win the heart war. in presidential elections what is plaguing our party. >> this comes after the first sort of votes of 2016 were cast this weekend with kentucky's paul winning cpac straw poll. we're joined live from washington with mark. i took a look at embargoed copy of this report coming out today. there are more than 200 recommendatio recommendations. >> it comes back to demographsidemographic demographics. what was very troubling for them as well as asian-americans as well. what prebus said on "face the nation" it's going to cost money. this i
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
engage, a large part of the population wouldn't engage with civil rights. then they said we have to find a way to do this. there's no reason why immigration reform and rand paul says hispanics are natural republicans which they used to say that about black people too. lost of people in america have faith in family and are not republicans. republicans should be natural to immigration reform. many depends on what kind of immigration reform. they could favor immigration reform that brings in large number of people driving down the wage rate who don't become citizens for an awfully long time and stop the hugest big government project i can think of which is building a useless wall between america and mexico. there's nothing conservative actually about the immigration, the nature of the immigration conversation. >> congressman i want you to respond to that. i want to talk about the devil in the details. where we are in the house and counter pose to where we are on guns right after we take a break. u can't go wrong loving i. vo: from the classic lines u can't go wrong loving i. to the elegant
says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be fireworks. there won't be cameras present, but we will get same-day audios to hear how everything goes down. >> it's always interesting. because we get the transcripts fwowrks hear the inflection and the voice, always interesting, so, we will have it. >> yes, we will. >> in the next hour, we will have a fair and balanced debate with two key players in the same cases. the head of the national organization for marriage and the national campaign director for the freedom to marry. where do you stand on the two same-sex marriage cases? tweet us your answers. we will read your responses, later on in this show. they came t
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil rights abuse. we need to make certain we are focused on the greatest revenue -- on the greatest american public. that really is in hansard are supporters of the -- in the hands of the prosecutors at the department of justice. >> what we are going to do is we are going to introduce the bill after -- and i am going to ask to your comments -- after the recess. it will be the bipartisan two of us. to set up a national commission made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative states. they have had to respond to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. ofare looking for a chairman stature who can come and take a year to report. i think our present system is dysfunctional and i sense there are very few people working the prisons. industry has been decimated because of congress. we tried to get prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made in the united states. there are only two baseball cap manufacturers i
young voters see these meters as some of the civil rights issues of our time. >> that is certainly true but this report didn't provide a clear direction for the republican party nor a clear analysis of what specifically went wrong. there was not a clear agenda to revitalize the economy and economic growth and fix an economy that is wobbly. the only real difference that the, at cpac was pat caddell who spoke truth to power about what would be in the report and what the republicans are doing. >> let me say something about what pat said because he will not toot his own horn but he was the only speaker whose speech has not been posted online by the guys that run cpac. >> i watched it online today. >> it has gone viral. >> that is the not the official version and the reason is what pat said a week ago friday. >> what was the message? >> the problem with the autopsy, which, by the way, is...this was what the jerusalem post said in a scandal newsreel, all are guilty but none are responsible. we have no message. meanwhile there was no explanation of the strategic failures, the real tactical fai
. this is not democracy. this is not freedom. >> right. >> what is it? >> what it is is first of all we set this thing up to where we supported the shiites and the sunnis are now -- there is going to be a version of a civil war. right now, as we speak here live on cnn there is an alternate reality on another network. they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> yes. i don't really want to, you know, disparage. >> let me read this tweet from donald rumsfeld. the iraqis deserve our respect and appreciation. >> he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney are walking the streets. the way they are trying to revise history saying it was a mistake or we were given bad information. say nobody sent me an e-mail or a tweet that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement they havethey are holding them there. i tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find no kids many n the basement? of course, you would think i would want to go after goldman sachs as bush wanted to go after saddam.
and the sewnries -- now there's going to be a version of a civil war. right now as we speak here live on cnn, there's an alternate reality taking place on another network, and they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> i don't really want to disparage them by name. >> donald rumsfeld, ten years ago, became long difficult work, all who played a role in history deserve our respect and appreciation. >> well, he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney, wolfowitz are still walking the street. the way they are trying to revise history now is by saying, well, it was a mistake or we were given bad information. you know, let's say somebody sent a tweet to us right now or sent me an e-mail that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement, they have kidnapped children, and they are holding them there, and i then tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find out that there's actually no kids kidnapped in the basement of goldman sachs, and, of course, you would think i would w
. and equally as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. based on his consultations with parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that esulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in ordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of ordan for their extreme warmth nd hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless, we are very much appreciative
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
there going, white guy, black guy, i'm from memphis, i can talk civil rights. >> wait a minute. >> if we're on the cover of a magazine, i think that may create other questions. >> the rapture? >> yes. >> go ahead, you were saying? >> the bottom line is, i would love to see a situation where all women, you know, it was about the content of the magazine, and the character of women, so beautiful, no matter what color we are. we have so much in common. i don't care what color we are. and women are women. and together we can change the world. >> okay. >> i don't think it will hurt though. >> to this panel, that's it. can't we just all get along? i got to get out of here. thank you very much. >> we love you, don. >> i love you guys too. thank you. thank you. ben, i'll take you up on that. >>> coming up, you know dr. oz, he gives health advice to millions of americans. now one tip he gave landed him in some legal hot water. why one viewer is suing the popular tv doctor coming up. i don't make any decisions about who to hire without going to angie's list first. you'll find reviews on home repair
. what would you tell an independent minded gay man who believes the right to marry is a civil right? what would you tell him about why he should vote republican? >> i would tell him, look. we might not agree on every single issue but, for the most part, if you look at where we are at in our economy and look at where we are with educational choice and our military positions and positions on a strong defense in our party for the most part, we agree on almost everyone and doesn't make someone a bad republican. it means we are good republicans and disagree on one or two things. my god. i don't agree with my wife on 100% of the issues but it doesn't mean we don't have a great marriage. i don't see how that is not -- that's not a reasonable position for people to take. i think it's entirely consistent. i think it's a human position to take and i think it's a decent position to take. >> mr. chairman, quickly. this is rich lawrie's column and he was writing this for politico. he said so much depends on the substance. no rebranding is going to make a difference if republican policy is not re
, but marriage is not a religious right. it's a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decidings who gets married and who doesn't. so in 1967, there was a supreme court case loving v. virginia and blacks continue marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that 9-0. it was -- they have ruled now fourteen times about the fundamental right to marriage. from the legal substantiate -- standpoint there's no argument. you can a make a moral standpoint. from a legal substantiate -- standpoint. how broadly they will rule, that we don't know. >> the nation's highest court hears highest arguments challenging proposition 8 the constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1:00 p.m. eastern. the reaction will play tomorrow night on c-span2. wednesday they hear arguments over the constitutionality of defense of marriage act. c-span and c-span radio will again have cove
of the olympic medalist don carlos discuss their personal experiences during the civil-rights movement live at the virginia festival of the book, saturday at 8:00 eastern, part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> on washington journal, we spoke with members of congress about the federal budget. we heard from house budget committee vice-chairman tom price and jerrold nadler. this is an hour. host: now joining us is representative tom price, vice chair of the budget committee. also a member of the ways and means tax writing committee. if you would, start by bringing us up to date on where the house is when it comes to the continuing resolution to the 2014 budget. guest: the budget was passed out of the house a couple of weeks ago. the senate has been dealing with that. is the pathanding that last evening. it is back in the house and people like the past that today. it is good news. one of the things we included with the approach with spending reductions. the budget is an exciting activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of repr
effecting that promise for everybody a cause of his life. as a civil rights attorney, as an aide to senator ted kennedy, as a member of montgomery county, maryland, county council, he has helped level the playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have here maryland governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed tom as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where he implemented the first living wage law. in his current role, he has opened pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities, with lbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of rules. he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there is plenty of work t
department's civil rights division, we have pathways into the workforce for everyone willing to contribute including lg bt americans and immigrants. and he has helped settle some of the largest cases ever of those targeted by unfair mortgage lending. tom has also spent a career as a consensus builder. has worked with ceos and labor leaders and federal and state and local government levels. and throughout he understands that our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have the security that they need on the job. a democratic voice in the workplace. everybody playing by the same set of rules. his knowledge and experience will make him an outstanding secretary of labor. there is plenty of work to do. we will have to work very hard to make sure that folks find jobs with wages and benefits. we have to make sure that our veterans are returning home from iraq and afghanistan and they have a chance to put their incredible skills and leadership to work. we need to build immigration system that works for every employee and every family and every busine
that trade agreement awaiting not deal with people that violate civil rights. exit code needs to clean their act up and they need to be -- mexico needs to clean their act up and they need to be put into a position where they have to help to clean up the border. .uest: debbie is right mexico has tremendous internal problems and i go into el paso, where people are talking with people that go in the car -- go across the border, and i am hearing from mexican citizens that they are trying to clean up the mess in their country. that would stabilize it. trade from the u.s. to mexico is on the uptake right now, so there are positive things happening, but it is an unstable region. host: a quick question about gun control -- the new york -- the "new york times" this morning saying that the colorado governor as a long path to gun limits. as the cochair of the western falcon -- caucus, what do you make of a western state governor looking like he will sign pieces of legislation? guest: i try to be german not to -- driven by not what will catch the voters, but by principle. the 1994 to 2004 they had
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